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Wesley Enoch's 'The Sunshine Club' returns

Joseph Guenzler -

The Sydney Coliseum Theatre is again touring the acclaimed musical "The Sunshine Club" written and directed by Noonuccal Nuugi man, Wesley Enoch, featuring music by John Rodgers.

Running from April 11 to April 20, the thought-provoking production unfolds in 1946, revolving around Frank Doyle - an Aboriginal serviceman returning home to find unchanged attitudes despite global shifts post-war.

Motivated by a vision for a better future, Frank establishes 'The Sunshine Club,' a inclusive space fostering laughter, romance, and dance.

Kicking off at the Sydney Coliseum, the 2 hour 20 minute musical will tour the nation with tickets starting from $59.

Roxanne McDonald takes the stage once again, reprising her role as Aunty Faith in 'The Sunshine Club' after more than 20 years.

"I reprised the role back in Brisbane at QPAC about 23 years ago," Ms McDonald said.

"Wesley got me back and it (the role) never really left me, it was always there."

Roxanne McDonald (blue dress) reprises her role as 'Aunty Faith' in the upcoming musical after two decades. (Image: Supplied/Kabuku)

Her return brings a seasoned perspective to the character, adding depth to the iconic role and contributing to the enduring legacy of the celebrated musical.

"I'm loving every minute of it. Wesley hasn't changed my choreography so it's all the same at it was 20 years ago," she said.

The musical explores themes of resilience, hope, and the pursuit of a brighter future, highlighting the challenges faced by Aboriginal communities in the aftermath of war.

"It touches on Aboriginal people not being allowed over the river after the dark and the boundaries, things like that."

"Even though you have have fun and be uplifted by the musical, that's the truth."

Under the HIT productions tour, this compelling musical, boasting a talented cast of 11 Indigenous artists and a 5-piece live band, embarks on a journey to various locations across Australia.

Notably, this tour marks over two decades since the musical's original debut in 1999, reaffirming its enduring impact.

"I initially wrote this as a way of bringing people together, especially in the reconciliation movement, this notion of black and white dancing together and the stories of our history, especially post World War II," Writer and Director Mr Enoch said.

"In this post or living with COVID world, it'll be even more important to see that cultural bonds can be formed by gathering as groups and dealing with social issues together."

Tickets are available at the Sydney Coliseum's website.

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