Jobs Events Advertise Newsletter

Indigenous Coalition of Peaks welcomes budget measures, calls for "genuine partnerships" to Close the Gap

Giovanni Torre -

The Coalition of Peaks - a representative body of over seventy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled peak organisations - has welcomed some measures in the federal budget and called for more to be done to close the gap.

Coalition acting lead convenor, Catherine Liddle, said it was not surprising the budget had a focus on the cost of living.

"Our mob are feeling the cost-of-living crisis acutely, and this budget's investments in housing, education and health will be good for our People, but more will be needed to bridge the widening gap," she said on Tuesday evening. ​

"We cannot close the gap unless governments change the way they work with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. We need genuine partnerships, not tick-a-box consultation.

"​Following tonight’s budget, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are looking forward to realising these genuine partnerships.​We need funding for Aboriginal community-controlled organisations, because they know how best to deliver services to their communities and get results."

In addition to representing more than seventy Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community-controlled peak organisations, the Coalition of Peaks also represents certain independent statutory authorities responsible for Closing the Gap policies, programs and services.

Most of the federal government's First Nations budget measures were announced in February; a $770million remote jobs program, and March's announcement of a $4billion remote housing program for the Northern Territory, were the major components of the Indigenous Affairs portfolio.

The 2024 budget commits $151 million to Closing the Gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

A focus on First Nations outcomes this year included $110 million over four years to bridge the education divide, with funding to extend existing programs, develop specific policies, attract and retain First Nations teachers and support Indigenous organisations.

A voluntary prison-to-employment $76million transition program would help First Nations prisoners find jobs after release and curb reoffending rates, while a four-year, $13 million youth program aims to help reduce Indigenous suicide rates.

Indigenous health services received a $95 million allocation for treating, preventing and testing for diseases prevalent in First Nations communities.

   Related   

Waanyi Garawa Gudanji woman Lizzie Hogan steps up for NT seat of Barkly
The Waanyi-Garawa-Gudanji woman Lizzie Hogan will run for the NT seat of Barkly...
Giovanni Torre 24 May 2024
New Human Rights Commission president appointed
The head of Victoria's Indigenous injustice and truth-telling body has been name...
Andrew Brown 24 May 2024
Groups reaffirm commitment to Uluru Statement after Voice referendum defeat
A collective of ‘civil society organisations, corporations and community groups’...
Jarred Cross 24 May 2024
Macron says New Caledonia voting reforms to be delayed
French President Emmanuel Macron has said after a day of talks in New Caledonia...

   Giovanni Torre   

Waanyi Garawa Gudanji woman Lizzie Hogan steps up for NT seat of Barkly
The Waanyi-Garawa-Gudanji woman Lizzie Hogan will run for the NT seat of Barkly...
Giovanni Torre 24 May 2024
Advocates urge Queensland spit hood ban as inquest into death in custody hears final witness
After over one month of hearings, on Tuesday the inquest into the death of mothe...
Giovanni Torre 21 May 2024
Exclusive: Board of leading WA native title group asks regulator to appoint special administrator
The board of a leading native title body in Western Australia’s Kimberley region...
Giovanni Torre 21 May 2024
Indigenous education peak body alliance welcomes federal commitment to community-controlled sector
The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Corporation (NATSIE...
Giovanni Torre 20 May 2024