Shooting Stars has announced the successful education program is extending into primary schools in Narrogin, Western Australia.

After their partnership in 2018 with Narrogin Senior High School saw much success, the Shooting Stars will now reach out to girls from both Narrogin Primary School and East Narrogin Primary School starting in Year 5.

Shooting Stars uses netball and other tools to encourage and motivate young Indigenous girls living in WA’s remote communities and towns to attend and participate in school. Currently, a total of 16 primary school participants have engaged in the program.

The program’s primary vision is increasing school attendance rates for young Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander girls living in remote and regional WA to 80-90 percent.

Fran Haintz, Executive Officer of Shooting Stars, said the bringing Shooting Stars program into primary schools will help set a sturdy foundation preparing the young girls for high school.

“The transition from primary school to secondary school can be daunting for many students. With the introduction of Shooting Stars in the later years of primary school in Narrogin, we believe the girls will be better equipped and ready to take on their secondary education,” Ms Haintz said.

David Harrison, Principal at Narrogin Primary School, has welcomed the program with open arms after seeing the positive impact Shooting Stars has had for the school’s Indigenous girls.

“We have seen the girls’ attendance improve because they enjoy participating in the Shooting Stars program. It has positively impacted on their behaviour and the respect they demonstrate for themselves and others,” Mr Harrison said.

“They are learning that it is their responsibility to make good choices and to be the best that they can be in all they do.”

By extending the program to Narrogin and East Narrogin Primary Schools, Shooting Stars has taken the next step toward its goal of working with at least 20 schools by the end of 2021.

Shooting Stars now engages over 350 students across eight locations, with 25 percent of participants improving their attendance every term. Fifty percent of participants maintain an average attendance rate of 80 percent or above.

By Sharnae Watson